Reclaiming the American Dream

A Reach Out Job Search News-Guest Blog
By Jesse Langley
Photo Credit-Google Images
Retraining for a second career with
online training are allowing individuals
to reclaim their version of
the American dream.
Ever since the economic downturn in 2008 the lives of former middle class Americans has been greatly impacted.  Many adults find themselves in a previously unimaginable position.  They’re looking for work.  

Instead of worrying about the best retirement plans or how much they should be saving for children’s college funds, many folks are focused on just keeping the mortgage paid and groceries in the refrigerator.

The phenomenon of middle class suburban families struggling just to keep body and soul together would have been unimaginable in any post World War II American scenario.  

In many ways the impact of the current economic climate on a large swath of the American public is not altogether unlike the Great Depression.  We may not have men jumping freight trains or long soup lines forming in the heartland, but that doesn’t mean that the repercussions of this economic plight are trivial in comparison.   

As the middle class continues to erode, middle aged workers looking to stay competitive will need to consider expanding their education.  For many, online training may be a strategy which could prove effective.  Many job sectors have slowed due to the economic downturn, but many are gone for good.  Manufacturing, once the bulwark of the middle class, is a segment of the economy not likely to ever regain its former glory.

Many families—for whom manufacturing once represented a dependable path to middle class comfort—will need to look elsewhere in the future.  This has happened before.  Millworkers in the Northeast had to deal with the same problem.  Families who had worked in textile mills for generations found layoffs and plant closures becoming increasingly common.  

As globalization became the new buzzword and market forces worked their inexorable will, millworkers had to learn new skills to survive.  The new reality was brutal.  If workers in other countries were willing to produce textiles for a wage far below the U.S. minimum wage and with tariffs dropped substantially, textile workers just couldn’t compete.

Textile workers did what many job seekers today are going to have to do.  They had to re-train in other job categories for which there was significant demand.  And for the most part, it worked.  There are still areas in the Northeast which are slowly recovering from being devastated by the closure of textile mills.  But slowly and surely, as workers re-train and change their expectations as well, many of these areas continue to rebound.

For workers who are considering re-training for a second career there are a few considerations which may keep them relevant in the workforce.  Career fields to consider could include more cutting edge jobs which are less likely to be outsourced to China, India and Brazil.  The current focus on green energy will likely continue to create demand for highly skilled workers in several different industries.  

Wind turbine production continues to ramp up and this requires not only initial manufacturing labor, but also maintenance labor throughout the life cycle of the wind turbines.  Bio-diesel production is moving from a niche industry to a much more mainstream business.  Especially as petroleum prices continue to rise, biodiesel is much more competitive than just a year ago.  

If American workers continue to display the innovative qualities that they’ve always been famous for—and are willing to re-train—the American dream may still be within their grasp.


Author's Bio
Jesse Langley lives near Chicago.  He divides his time among work, writing and family life.  He has a keen interest in blogging and social media and also advocates for online education.  In addition, Mr. Langley writes for the Professional Intern.


Never miss any of the stories on ROJS by adding our RSS Feed Below!
Subscribe
Tell us your thoughts about this article!

Enhanced by Zemanta

0 comments :